Lincoln National Park

23rd – 28th March 2017

Thursday 23rd

After a bit more of a look around Port Lincoln we headed south to the National Park – it’s a short drive. Of the several camps available we chose a close one that was well recommended – Surfleet Cove. You know, it was alright, nothing wrong with it – sealed road in, numbered, separate sites, clean loos, water from a tank, and even a ‘camp host’.  However the site was off the beach a little (50 metres) and you couldn’t see the water. We went for a 6km loop walk, part of the ‘Investigator Trail’ – it was good to get moving again. A family of emus met us on the beach and later wandered through our campsite – that was a bit special.

A family of emus on the beach at Surfleet Cove. Dad at the back and 7 adolescents in front.

A family of emus on the beach at Surfleet Cove. Dad at the back and 7 adolescents in front.

Friday 24th we decided to go for a drive and look at the other campsites. Didn’t take long to lose the sealed road, but it still wasn’t too bad. We found a site we loved so stayed there – another of the advantages of a motorhome, not having to go back to pack up the caravan when you change your mind.

Fisherman Point divides Boston Bay on one side and the delightful Fisherman Cove on the other. We camped perched atop the cliff overlooking the cove from the side of the motorhome and Port Lincoln in the distance from the back doors. Wow – now this is more like it! Million dollar views!

This is our campsite at Fisherman Point in Lincoln NP, at low tide. We loved it here so much we stayed for a lot longer than planned. Access to the beach was very easy down a well-formed path.

This is our campsite (on the cliff top) at Fisherman Point in Lincoln NP, at low tide. We loved it here so much we stayed for a lot longer than planned. Access to the beach was very easy down a well-formed path.

Saturday 25th we set off to do the ‘out and back’ walk to the lighthouse, another section of the Investigator Trail, but enjoyed the walk so much we went on to see Donington Peninsula and explore a little down the eastern coast before crossing through the middle back to home.

The Investigator was the name of the ship Matthew Flinders used to circumnavigate Australia in 1801/2 mapping the coastline as he went. His maps were so accurate it wasn’t until recent years that they were replaced. Flinders was born in Donington in Lincolnshire – after which he named this area. Flinders rates very highly in South Australia with many places named in his honour, not the least being the Flinders Ranges where we’ll be in a few weeks time. It was Flinders who put forward the suggestion that the whole continent should be named Australia, replacing New Holland and New South Wales – for that I am very grateful! An excellent book I can recommend by David Hill is, The Great Race. The race between the English and the French to complete the Map of Australia.

On our walk around Donington Peninsula, Lincoln NP. Note the low shrubby flora. A lot of variety in the shrubs, some were flowering.

On our walk around Donington Peninsula, Lincoln NP. Note the low shrubby flora. A lot of variety in the shrubs, some were flowering.

Several sections of the walk are along the beach, then on paths through low shrub bushland and finally a good sandy path back across the island. A truly enjoyable 13 km walk on an overcast, pleasantly cool day. A very well sign-posted path – well done SA Parks.

Arty shot of a pelican and a cormorant at rest. Lincoln NP

Arty shot of a pelican and a cormorant at rest. Lincoln NP

Sunday 26th Being a weekend there’s a few extra campers here. It seems the Port Lincoln locals come over to camp then motor their boats over, it’s only 5 nm across Boston Bay. During the day our little cove entertained 2 or 3 groups of people, BBQing on the beach, pulling an inflatable with kids on it behind the boat and generally having a good time. They all left early afternoon and once more the serenity of the campsite has been restored – just us, the gulls, pelicans and numerous other birds … and two other campers, well away from us. I’ve really enjoyed the birdlife here, there’s so many different types of birds, both land and seabirds. A pair of beautifully coloured parrots that we’d never seen before visit the trees beside our campsite each evening. I looked them up in bird book and, believe it or not, they’re Port Lincoln Parrots. I’m pleased we spotted them.

The Port Lincoln Parrot. Thanks Wikicommons.

The Port Lincoln Parrot. Thanks Wikicommons.

A brief walk on the beach followed by a swim just before sunset finished off a perfect day.

Contemplating sunset at Fisherman Point campsite. This is a Pacific Gull - a much larger bird than the Silver Gulls we are used to, but smaller then the Kelp Gull that are also on this coastline.

Contemplating sunset at Fisherman Point campsite. This is a Pacific Gull – a much larger bird than the Silver Gulls we are used to, but smaller than the Kelp Gull that are also on this coastline.

We’re booked in to Memory Cove for the next two days but have decided to stay here – it’s beautiful and relaxing with plenty to do, so why move!

Monday and Tuesday 27th and 28th

And it has been a relaxing and enjoyable 6 days here in the National Park. Since the weekend we’ve had the place to ourselves. We’ve swum, walked, rested, did little things around the motorhome, cooked, eaten yummy meals, and read books – just what we both needed. Today Steve started investigating geocaches in the area. There are several around so we set off on a walk to find a couple of them. The first was at the far end of our beach and, while tricky to find, Steve was successful.

Awww - how happy is he! He's just found the geocache.

Awww – how happy is he! He’s just found the geocache.

The next one was further away hidden amongst some very old, but very interesting, rusting farm machinery. Unfortunately he wasn’t so successful with that one.

Aww look at that sad face! No geocache could be found. :-(

Aww look at that sad face! No geocache could be found. 🙁

Tomorrow we leave the Park. It’s been a good stay and I recommend it to everyone reading this.

To see more of our photos of Lincoln National Park CLICK HERE.

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